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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
for this far right politics, and virginia in particular. voting again for president obama and electing a democratic senator. virginia is increasingly a moderate state. we're not in texas, my home state. if kucuccinelli were running in texas, arizona, even in georgia, these types of politics wouldn't just hurt him, they'd help him, but he's not. he's running in virginia, the land of whole food moms and dads. but at a broader level i find the cuccinelli race interesting because i think it might be a precursor to what we may see in the midterms and perhaps in the 2016 presidential election. we already hear some rumblings about perry getting back into the race, santorum -- >> oh, lord help us, no. please. >> i swear. >> please, no, not the return of rick perry. you cannot be serious. >> i swear to you. >> oh, lord. okay, jimmy, mr. cuccinelli, he sued over obama care, lost. sued the epa, lost. is there anything more dangerous to a political party than a leader who consistently picks fight he loses? >> how many times do you have to lose to be kaumd a loser. >> right. >> let's be honest abou
election. and obama doesn't. so as his capital goes down and his vision gets wider historically, everybody else's vision is getting narrower to that -- not even to election day in '14, but of the primary day. >> so with all that said, leigh, you look at the deal, as michael said, the president came out big, not only does he want taxes to go up on the wealthy, but he wants stimulus spending. he wants the power to raise the debt ceiling. where is the middle ground when you look at this? who blinks on these questions of taxes? >> well, i mean, everyone's doubling down and waiting for the other side to blink first. and that's why we're going to push this to the end. i think michael makes a good point. we don't know what's happening. this could be all choreographed. we don't know what's happening with the side conversations. both sides will probably give. i mean, i think everyone knows that's going to be the case. but, you know, the president has a lot of leverage. he, of course, doesn't have absolute leverage, but he has more than he had. we learned a lesson in 2001 with the debt ceiling negot
the election, president obama reiterated his demand that any deal has to raise taxes on the highest earners. but yesterday the president also appeared to show a little bit of flexibility in lowering those tax rates in the future. take a listen to what he said. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and the further reforms and entitlements that i'm prepared to make, that we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal -- what i've suggested is, let's essentially put a down payment on taxes. let's let tax rates on the upper income folks go up. and then let's set up a process with a time certain at the end of 2013 or the fall of 2013 where we work on tax reform. we look at what loopholes and deductions both democrats and republicans are willing to close. and it's possible that we may be able to lower rates by broadening the base a
kicked around. it happened because obama kept working but the democrats let a buffoon get elected in 2010. we're living with that guy. >> stephanie: yep. >> so obama never stopped. he won in 2012. the democrats gotta pick up on that and they gotta start working now for 2014 to work on the house especially and keep the senate. >> stephanie: bill, you're right. we may need to throw out the rest of -- we need to -- we got like -- act like we got something done in the last two years. hello, groher. grover norquist on "meet the press." if the president pushes us off the fiscal cliff tea party 2 is going to make tea party 1 look -- wharf grover! -- whatever, grover! >> sequels almost always are -- >> stephanie: suck. >> way worse than the original. >> stephanie: okay. gayle in syracuse. hello, gayle. >> caller: hi. >> stephanie: hi. >> caller: now, i was thinking, now i'm as concerned as anybody else about the fiscal cliff. but thinking -- you know that the new congress that is coming in has less of the crazy te
and in his first post-election interview president obama again rejected the house republican counteroffer that is on the table. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> let's hope he sticks to it. >> g.o.p. leaders aren't only dealing with the president and congressional democrats they're dealing with a split within their own ranks. more conservative republicans don't want party leaders to compromise anymore than they think they already have. even though the republican plan offers up $800 billion in new taxes without upping tax rates at all tea party leaders say higher taxes shouldn't be in any form because it is not what republicans stand for. south carolina senator jim demint went so far as to call on supporters of his senate conservative fund to call senate republicans and ask them to oppose what he's calling the boehner tax hike. the looming question for re
because obama clearly sees that he has a mandate out of the election on fiscal cliff issues. even though it wasn't a huge issue in the debate the white house is behaving like it has that mandate. what you have been seeing is republicans showing signs of flexibility and i am not just talking john boehner saying revenue is on the table. we have republican senators saying they will stand up to the grover norquist tax pledge. they're willing to break it which is pretty big news. we also have the influential member of congress, republican tom cole saying we have got to agree to extend the tax cut just for those people making $250,000 and below and letting the more wealthy be taxed. definitely flexibility but what you see from democrats is an unwillingness to do serious entitlement reform that would lead to reductions in spending. they want to kick the can down the road and do more of the next year with the vague promises. dennis: the think republicans will be willing to agree upfront to more tax revenue or higher tax rates as we go without a firm cap on entitlement reform? >> that is the big
the election you were asked whether if obama won taxes would have to go up. i are acknowledging that they will. >> the day after the election i came here and made it clear that the republicans would put revenue on the table as a way to begin to move the process to get this resolved. >> my question is, what message do you have for people who look at the negotiating position and believe it's inevitable you'll have to accept some compromise on tax. >> revenue is on the table. but revenue was only on the table if there was a serious spending cut as part of this agreement. it has to be part of the agreement. we have a debt crisis. we are spending too much. and while we are willing to put revenue on the table, we have to recognize is the spending that's out of control. >> roughly what size spending cuts do you think it would take to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff? do you think that at least the promise of spending cuts has to be included in this level deal at this time? >> i don't think there's -- it's productive for either side to lay out hard lines in terms of what the size of the spending cuts
by a video of a detroit city councilwoman who calls on president obama to bail out her cash-strapped city for payback for their votes. >> after the election of jimmy carter, he went to washington, d.c., he came back with some bacon. that's what you do. our people in an overwhelming way supported the reelection of this president and there ought to be a quid pro quo and you ought to exercise leadership -- of course not just that, but why not. martha: you have got to bring home the bacon according to that councilwoman. many cities and state are in the same situation. will they make the same request of the president and washington? stuart, what do you think about that piece of tape there? >> finally it has been said in public. the detroit city councilmember saying publicly we deserve a bailout. detroi indeed vote overwhelmingly for president obama. 73% of the vote went for president obama. detroit will probably run out of money within days. the word bankruptcy is being applied to the city of detroit. she says there ought to be a quid pro quo, why not. she is publicly calling for what amounts
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)